Department Award and Publication Highlights

Graduate Student Publications:

 

Ilia, A., & O’Donnell, J. (2018). An Assessment of Two Models of Wave Propagation in an Estuary Protected by Breakwaters. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, 6(4), 145. doi:10.3390/jmse6040145

 

Hedley, J.D.; Mirhakak, M.; Wentworth, A.; Dierssen, H.M. Influence of Three-Dimensional Coral Structures on Hyperspectral Benthic Reflectance and Water-Leaving Reflectance. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2688.

 

Sasaki, M., Hedberg, S., Richardson, K., & Dam, H.G. (2019). Complex interactions between local adaptation, phenotypic plasticity and sex affect vulnerability to warming in a widespread marine copepod. R. Soc. open sci., 6(3). https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.182115

 

Faculty Awards:

 

Sandra Shumway was awarded the FUCOBI Foundation Award for Outstanding Contributions by Women in Aquaculture, the APEX Award for Publishing Excellence (Journal of Shellfish Research) and the Association Trends Gold Award (Journal of Shellfish Research).

 

Senjie Lin (PI) and Huan Zhang (Co-PI) received a two-year grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique for studying dinoflagellate gene functions. Titled “Moving from transformation to CRISPR/Cas9 gene knockout for dinoflagellates.”

 

Michael Whitney, has been awarded a Fulbright fellowship at the University of Iceland, set to start in 2020.

Highlights:  https://clas.uconn.edu/2019/03/18/marine-sciences-professor-awarded-fulbright-fellowship/

 

Samantha Siedlecki was awarded a NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) fellowship.

Highlights: https://today.uconn.edu/school-stories/marine-knowledge-is-power/#

 

 

Student Awards:

 

Jo-Marie Kasinak was awarded the Torrey Botanical Society’s Greller Graduate Student Research Award for the Conservation of Local Flora and Ecosystems.

 

Incoming graduate student, Monica Garity was awarded a Harriott Fellowship through the UConn Graduate School.

 

Amin Ilia, Matt Sasaki, and Brittany Sprecher received awards from the William A. Lund, Jr. Fellowship in Marine Sciences and the Andrew J. Nalwalk Memorial Award.

 

Tyler Griffin, Yipeng He, Amin Ilia, Molly James, Ewaldo Leitao, Michael Mathuri, Patricia Myer, Sean Ryan, Matt Sasaki, Emma Shipley, Sue Smith, and Mengyang Zhou received UConn Graduate School predoctoral fellowship awards through the department of Marine Sciences.

 

Graduate students Halle Berger, Sean Ryan, and Lingjie Zhou received awards from the John Rankin Scholarship Fund, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

 

Marine Knowledge is Power

Marine Knowledge is Power: Predicting Ocean Resources for Coastal Communities

Big ocean changes are happening, but global trends may not accurately represent what happens in coastal regions. With support from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), UConn marine scientist Samantha Siedlecki’s research aims to help address this gap in knowledge.

Through a new NCAR program launching this summer, Siedlecki will couple global models with regionally refined systems so that coastal communities can better predict what biogeochemical changes their waters might face in the future. Her NCAR project focuses specifically on coastal biogeochemistry and health metrics relevant to marine resource management on the Northeast Atlantic shelf.

UConn Today: https://today.uconn.edu/school-stories/marine-knowledge-is-power/Twitter: https://twitter.com/UConnResearch/status/1131164302327595009LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6536935526912573441

Jim O’Donnell sits down with Face the Facts

Jim O’Donnell is a professor of marine sciences at UConn and leader of the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Change. He sat down with Face the Facts With Max Reiss to talk about our changing climate and what impacts Connecticut residents could see in the future, especially along the shoreline Face the Facts With Max Reiss airs Sundays at 10 a.m.

Congratulations 2019 Graduates!

Yan Jia, Qiang Sun, Michael Whitney, Steven Deignan-Schmidt

Yan Jia, Qiang Sun, Prof. Michael Whitney, and Steven Deignan-Schmidt at the doctoral commencement ceremony. Steven Deignan-Schmidt was profiled for the CLAS Class of 2019: https://clas.uconn.edu/class-of-2019/#deignan-schmidt.

 

Gihong Park, Youngmi Shin, James O'Donnell

Gihong Park, Youngmi Shin, and Prof. James O’Donnell at the doctoral commencement ceremony.

 

Chris Murray

Christopher Murray after the doctoral commencement ceremony.

 

Penny Vlahos and Allison Byrd

Prof. Penny Vlahos and Allison Byrd after the master’s commencement ceremony.

 

2019 Senior Recognition Avery Point

Marine Sciences graduates and faculty at the Senior Recognition Ceremony at Avery Point on May 10, 2019.

16th Annual Marine Sciences Day: May 9th, 2019

In collaboration with Project Oceanology, the graduate students from Department of Marine Sciences hosted workshops for middle schoolers to teach them about marine sciences and research being done in the department. Students extracted DNA from strawberries and put it in necklaces for all to see. Another workshop had students identify plankton under microscopes.

Thanks to students from the McManus, Lin, and Dam Labs for organizing and running these activities, and inspiring the next generation of scientists.

DMS graduate students present at UConn’s 2nd Climate Research Symposium

On April 30th, four graduate students from the Marine Sciences Department traveled to UConn, Storrs to present their research at UConn’s 2nd Climate Research Symposium cohosted by the Geology and Marine Sciences departments. The students were Kelly McGarry (Ph.D student; top left), Halle Berger (Master’s student; top right), Sarah McCart (Master’s student; bottom left) and Alec Shub (Master’s student; bottom right). Everyone’s presentations were well received, and Sarah McCart even won the graduate student poster competition!

The event featured two keynote speakers; Professor Margaret Rubega of UConn, and Professor Tim Cronin of MIT. Professor Rubega talked about science communication and how the scientific community could better communicate their climate change research to non-scientists without using overbearing jargon and too many words. Professor Cronin gave a speech on his past research on the suppression of Arctic air formation with climate warming.

By Callie Concannon

2nd Climate Research Symposium

Long Island Sound Habitat Mapping website now available

A new website highlighting the Long Island Sound Habitat Mapping Initiative went live on Earth Day. The website provides information on the background and motivation for the mapping initiative, summaries of the field work conducted, interpretive story maps describing some of the results, links to data products and publications generated and multimedia links to images and video of at-sea operations that illustrate the beauty and complexity of the underwater habitats of the Sound.

https://lismap.uconn.edu/

DMS post-doctoral researcher Emma Cross publishes new brachiopod research

15 April 2019. Dr. Emma Cross from the Baumann Lab just published her latest paper about brachiopod resilience to future ocean acidification in Environmental Science & Technology. The project involved long-term culturing of a polar and a temperate brachiopod under future ocean acidification and warming conditions during Emma’s PhD-research with the British Antarctic Survey. Substantial shell dissolution posed a threat to both species under ocean acidification, with more extensive dissolution occurring in the polar species.

Unexpectedly, however, the authors also discovered that brachiopods thicken their shell from the inner shell surface when extensive dissolution occurs at the outer shell surface under ocean acidification. This important finding furthers our understanding how predicted vulnerable marine calcifiers might cope under future environmental change.


Cross-ES&T-Graphical-abstract


Cross, E. L., Harper, E. M. and Peck, L. S. 2019. Thicker shells compensate extensive dissolution in brachiopods under future ocean acidification. Environmental Science & Technology (published online March 29, 2019).

New publication of mercury levels in aquatic wildlife and the atmosphere

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17 April 2019. Rob Mason was a co-author of a recent publication in Science of the Total Environment (How closely do mercury trends in fish and other aquatic wildlife track those in the atmosphere? – Implications for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention) that provided a review of the potential timescale and magnitude of response of fish in different ecosystems to changes in inputs of mercury to the atmosphere from anthropogenic activities. The paper is a synthesis of information gathered for the 2018 Global Mercury Assessment Report, published by the United Nations Environmental Program as part of the activities of the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a globally binding treaty that has been initiated to reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions to the biosphere.